Back in 1986 when Germany have won the World Cup part 2

Back in 1986 when Germany have won the World Cup part 2

May 19, 2020

Back in 1986 when Germany have won the World Cup part 2: That world is gone. It is hard, impossible ufabet perhaps, to imagine a World Cup in which the public spontaneously take to the field; impossible to think that a twenty-first-century Maradona could be carried aloft on the shoulders of the crowd, and that the authorities could be either slack enough or relaxed enough to handle it. Click here to read the part 1.

Back in 1986 when Germany have won the World Cup part 2

Back in 1986 when Germany have won the World Cup part 2

The fabulously shambolic trophy ceremony that follows is even better. On that occasion, the West Germans receive their losers’ medals in the shadow of Argentina’s celebrations. FIFA President João Havelange, at least, knows what he is doing, sternly giving the cup to the ufabet Mexican president who passes it to Maradona. 

A very flustered Sepp Blatter, then General Secretary of FIFA, appears late with a tray of medals and has to haul Maradona back to give him his before the cup can be lifted and shared. The team descends with the trophy to the pitch, where there are now thousands upon thousands of people.

One group, with a huge Argentinian blue-and-white-striped banner, is running an erratic, elliptical circuit of victory. The players and the cup are swept up alongside it, and Maradona himself is lifted onto the ยูฟ่าเบท shoulders of a fan, balanced from behind by others so he can hold the cup aloft. People around strain to touch him and to kiss the cup. Framed by the TV cameras, there is not a member of the security forces or a commercial logo in shot.

Viewed from our own time, the 1986 World Cup final was the last in which the balance of forces, inside the stadium and beyond, was sufficiently in ยูฟ่าเบท favour of the crowd that a real, spontaneous, chaoticcarnival could take place – a world in which, if only for a moment, economic and political power and their needs were trumped by the numbers and the exuberance of the crowd, a proxy for the forces of global civil society.